The Black Prince, by Edward Blore

Edward, Prince of Wales (The Black Prince) by Edward Blore (1789-1879). 1826. Illustration for Philip Bliss's text in The Monumental Remains of Noble and Eminent Persons, Comprising the Sepulchral Antiquities of Great Britain. Engraving numbered 1376. Source of image: the Internet Archive edition of 1826 in the Cornell University Library; text by Jacqueline Banerjee.

The text for this monument concludes,

Upon the whole it may be observed, that the monument of the Black Prince, although not remarkable for richness of design, may, from its connexion with the illustrious individual it has been raised to commemorate, and the extreme beauty of the workmanship, rank amongst the most valuable monumental remains which this, or any other, country can produce.

This fascination with the medieval spirit and its expression lay behind the Gothic Revival. Here it manifests itself in someone who himself was an architect, and so could turn his skills to draughtsmanship, and produce churches and other buildings in the Gothic style.

[You may use this image without prior permission for any scholarly or educational purpose as long as you (1) credit the Cornell University Library and the Internet Archive and (2) link your document to this URL in a web document or cite it in a print one.]

Source

Blore, Edward. "Edward, Prince of Wales, 1330-1376. Monument at Canterbury." The Monumental Remains of Noble and Eminent Persons, Comprising the Sepulchral Antiquities of Great Britain. London: Harding, Lepard, amd Co., 1826. Engraving numbered 1376, and accompanying text. Internet Archive. Web. 17 July 2012.


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Last modified 17 July 2012