Introduction

Whereas Harry C. Edwards' fourteen illustrations in conventionally-sized McClure's Magazine, July 1893, are with a single exception small-scale woodcuts (some mere thumbnails) dropped into the eleven-page letterpress of Hardy's "Master John Horseleigh, Knight" (quaintly spelled "Knyght" in the American serial), those by W. B. Wollen in the Extra Summer Number of The Illustrated London News (12 June 1893) are much larger: an uncaptioned headpiece and four large-scale lithographs, which focus on the story's principals: the indignant brother, Roger, both detective and murderer (pages 5, 6, and 8); John Horseleigh, the secretive aristocrat whose double-life leads to his death (headpiece, pages 6, 7, and 8); Horseleigh's aristocratic and bourgeois wives: the "portly dame," daughter of "Master Richard Phelipson, of Montislope in Nether Wessex" (page 7), and Roger's sister, Edith (headpiece, pages 6 and 8). While Hardy lovingly recreates in accumulated detail his Renaissance settings, Wollen is careful in his depiction of the Renaissance costumes; both the illustrations and the letterpress indicate their creators were equally interested in the complicated marital relations that lead to Horseleigh's death and Roger's exile.

An American illustrator, Harry C. Edwards, a month after the appearance of "Master John Horseleigh, Knight" accompanied by W. B. Wollen' s large-scale lithographs in The Illustrated London News, provided Hardy's Renaissance tale of mistaken motives and familial vengeance with fourteen uncaptioned small-scale illustrations for the more conventionally-formatted McClure's Magazine, July 1893. Moreover, in contrast to Wollen's lithographs, Edwards' plates are (with a single exception) small woodcuts (mostly thumbnails) dropped into the eleven-page letterpress of Hardy's "Mastr John Horseleigh, Knyght" in the American serial. The illustrations by military artist W. B. Wollen are much larger: an uncaptioned headpiece and four large-scale lithographs, which focus on the story's principals: the indignant brother, Roger, both detective and murderer (pages 5, 6, and 8); John Horseleigh, the secretive aristocrat whose double-life leads to his death (headpiece, pages 6, 7, and 8); Horseleigh's aristocratic and borgeois wives: the "portly dame," daughter of "Master Richard Phelipson, of Montislope in Nether Wessex" (page 7), and Roger's sister, Edith (headpiece, pages 6 and 8). While Hardy lovingly recreates in accumulated detail his vision of early Renaissance Wessex, Wollen is equally careful in his depiction of the Renaissance costumes; both the illustrations and the letterpress indicate their creators were equally interested in the complicated relationships that create misunderstanding, domestic tragedy, and ultimately the extinction of an aristocratic line. Edwards' plates, focusing on characters, rely for their meaning upon the reader' s comparing the letterpress to the graphics, there being none of the informative caption

Works

References

Hardy, Thomas. "Master John Horseleigh, Knight." McClure's Magazine. (New York) 1 (July 1893): 136-46.


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