That Camel passed . . . around the ruined Pump by Harry Furniss. Swain, engraver. 1889. Illustration for Lewis Carroll's Sylvia and Bruno Concluded, p. 372. Source: Hathi Digital Library Trust version of a copy in the Pennsylvania State University Library. [Click on the image to enlarge it.]

That Camel passed, as Day grew dim
Around the ruined Pump.
“O broken heart! O broken limb!
It needs,” that Camel said to him,
“Something more fairy-like and slim,
To execute a jump!”

This is the third of a Series of four Furniss pictures accompanying the hilarious Lewis Carroll nonsense poem in chapter 23, “The Pig-Tale.” The Camel appears in the opening picture, “Horrid Was That Pig’s Despair”, p. 367; and as here at p. 372, with original title “That Pig Lay Still As Any Stone”. The ability of his chosen artist to quickly produce a number of sets of three or even four pictures, to illustrate various nursery rhymes, had quickly impressed Dodgson-Carroll, as he noted in the Preface to his final volume of the saga, Sylvie and Bruno Concluded, p. xii. — Ray Dyer

[You may use this image without prior permission for any scholarly or educational purpose as long as you (1) credit the credit the Hathi Digital Library Trust and the University of North Carolina Library and (2) link your document to this URL in a web document or cite the Victorian Web in a print one.]

Bibliography

Carroll, Lewis. Sylvia and Bruno Concluded. London: Macmillan & Co., 1893. Hathi Digital Library Trust version of a copy in the Pennsylvania State University Library. Web. 20 September 2016.


Last modified 10 May 2016