The Brothers

The Brothers by Phiz (Hablot K. Browne). Illustration for Charles Dickens's Little Dorrit, May 1856 (Part 10: Book One, Chapter 19). Source: Steig, plate 110. [Return to text of Steig.]

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Passage Illustrated

The brothers William and Frederick Dorrit, walking up and down the College-yard — of course on the aristocratic or Pump side, for the Father made it a point of his state to be chary of going among his children on the Poor side, except on Sunday mornings, Christmas Days, and other occasions of ceremony, in the observance whereof he was very punctual, and at which times he laid his hand upon the heads of their infants, and blessed those young insolvents with a benignity that was highly edifying — the brothers, walking up and down the College-yard together, were a memorable sight. Frederick the free, was so humbled, bowed, withered, and faded; William the bond, was so courtly, condescending, and benevolently conscious of a position; that in this regard only, if in no other, the brothers were a spectacle to wonder at. — Book the First, "Poverty," Chapter 19, "The Father of The Marshalsea in Two Or Three Relations."

References

Steig, Michael. Dickens and Phiz. Bloomington & London: Indiana U.P., 1978.


Last modified 19 March 2016