Junction of Lyn and Bagworthy Water. Photograph by Catherine W. Barnes Ward. Source: Snell, facing p. 169. [This image may be used without prior permission for any scholarly or educational purpose.] Scanned image and text by George P. Landow [This image may be used without prior permission for any scholarly or educational purpose.]

About two miles below our farm, the Bagworthy water runs into the Lynn, and makes a real river of it. Thence it hurries away, with strength and a force of wilful waters, under the foot of a barefaced hill, and so to rocks and woods again, where the stream is covered over, and dark, heavy pools delay it. There are plenty of fish all down this way, and the farther you go the larger they get, having deeper grounds to feed in; and sometimes in the summer months, when mother could spare me off the farm, I came down here, with Annie to help (because it was so lonely), and caught well-nigh a basketful of little trout and minnows, with a hook and a bit of worm on it, or a fern-web, or a blow-fly, hung from a hazel pulse-stick. For of all the things I learned at Blundell's, only two abode with me, and one of these was the knack of fishing, and the other the art of swimming." — John Ridd in Lorna Doone, ch. 7, p. 48 [GPL]

References

Blackmore, R. D. Lorna Doone: A Romance of Exmoor. New York: Clarke, Given and Hooper, 1890. [e-text of this edition at Electronic Text Center, University of Virginia Library

Snell, F. J. The Blackmore Country. London: Adm and Charles Black, 1911.


Victorian Overview

Last updated 29 April 2006