Sir James M’Grigor, Bart., K.C.B

Sir James M’Grigor, Bart., K.C.B

Matthew Noble (1817-76)

1865

Source: Illustrated London News

Complete caption: “Sir James M’Grigor, Bart., K.C.B.. Late Director-General of the Army Medical department, by M. Noble. Erected at Cgelsea barracks.”

“This statue of the late Sir James M’Grigor, Bart., K.C.B., Director-General of tho Army Medical Department, of which we give an Illustration, is from the studio of Mr. Noble, and is admirable, both as a work of art and is a faithful and pleasing like-ness. We may also congratulate the committee on having secured for it a most appropriate site, fronting the newly-erected barracks of the Guards at Chelsea, with the hospital in the rear, where a few old veterans still linger and talk over the storm of Badajoz and the glories of the Peninsular; and where it will fitly perpetuate the memory of one whose whole life was spent in the service of the soldier, and whose aim and reward was the simple performance of his duty.

“A short memoir of Sir James M'Grigor, whose unobtrusive but useful service, extending over sixty years, raised him, unaided by influence, to the highest post in his profession, may not be uninteresting. Ho was a native of Aberdeen, and entered the Army, as surgeon of the 88th (or Connaught Rangers), in 1793. The scene of his first experience was in Hol[l]and. under the Duke of York; then in the West Indies, where the yellow fever Witt decimating our troops. His next tour of service was to Ceylon and Bombay, whence he crossed the desert with Sir D. Baird's force to join the army under Sir R. Abercrombie in Egypt, a campaign memorable as the first in which a gleam of success dawned on the British arms.” [continued below]

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