Introduction

1title1 Thomas Nast created 52 illustrations for the 1873 Household Edition of Pickwick Papers issued by Harper & Bros., New York. Typically, these illustrations, with the exception of a few full-page character studies, are set horizontally in the middle of a page and are 10.3 cm high by 13.4 cm high on a double-columned page approximately 21 cm high. Thus, each plate occupies approximately half of the page. The print is sharp, but quite fine, so that the entire book is 332 pages, exclusive of a four-page Harper's "advertiser" for its "Valuable Standard Works." In contrast, the British Household Edition is printed on heavier paper, has larger type, and each page is frame as well as double-columned, in more accurate imitation of the original Household Words format. With larger type, the Chapman and Hall text is 400 pages (there is no "advertiser"). In size and juxtaposition on the page, Phiz's fifty-seven illustrations are similar to Nast's fifty-two. However, Chapman and Hall provide a two-and-a-half page index (pp. x-xii) to Phiz's illustrations, while the Harper and Brothers' text has no such index for Nast's. Phiz has provided four full-page illustrations, running about one to one hundred pages of letter-press; Nast begins with two full-page illustrations, then provides three others throughout the text.

Introduction

  • 1. Frontispiece, "Went slowly and gravely down the slide with his feet about a yard and a quarter apart" [Page 178.

  • 2. "Mr. Pickwick" [Page 162. Second Frontispiece. [Pickwick under the mistletoe at Dingley Dell]

  • Uncaptioned Title-Page Vignette [Sam Weller welcomes the reader.]

  • Uncaptioned half-page plate [Unanimously agreed to resolutions forming the Pickwick Club] Page 9

  • 5. "And addressed club himself had founded" Page 11

  • 6. "Have you got everything?" said Mr. Winkle, in an agitated tone. Page 20.

  • 7. "Never shall I forget the repulsive sight that met my eyes I turned round." Page 24.

  • 8. Mr. Snodgrass seized his revered leader by the coat tail, and dragged him backward. [Page 27

  • 9. Mr. Pickwick displayed that perfect coolness and self-possession, which are the indispensable accompaniments of a great mind. [Page 29

  • 10. "Bless my soul" exclaimed the agonized Mr. Pickwick, "there's the other horse running away!" Page 35

  • 11. "To describe the confusion that ensued would be impossible" Page 44.

  • 12. "Mr. Tupman" [and Cupid, full-page illustration facing p. 48]

  • 13. "He knows nothing of what has happened" he whispered [Page 52

  • 14. "Hurra!" echoed Mr. Pickwick, taking off his hat and dashing it on the floor, and insanely casting his spectacles into the middle of the kitchen. [Page 54

  • 15. "Mr. Winkle. Take your hands off. Mr. Pickwick, let me go, Sir!" Page 57.

  • 16. "Is this the room?" murmured the little gentleman. Sam nodded assent. [Page 64

  • 17. "He, too, will have a companion," resumed Mr. Pickwick. [Page 74

  • 18. "He's kissing 'em all!" Page 81

  • 19. A most extraordinary change seemed to come over it. [Page 86

  • 20. "Come on, Sir!" replied Mr. Pickwick [Page 91

  • 21. That immortal gentleman completely over the wall. [Pickwick tumbles over the wall of the ladies' seminary] Page 100

  • 22. "Sir!" exclaimed Mr. Winkle, starting from his chair. [Page 107

  • 23. Mr. Winkle. [in sporting mode, with shotgun; full-page illustration, facing p. 113]

  • 24. "Who are you, you rascal?" Page 117

  • 25. "Pray do it, Sir!" Page 121

  • 26. "She's been gettin' rayther in the Methodistical order lately, Sammy." Page 132

  • 27. "Wretch," said the lady. [Page 137

  • 28. "What is the meaning of this, Sir?" Page 143

  • 29. "Well, now," said Sam. [Page 153

  • 30. "I suppose you've heard what's going forward, Mr. Weller?" said Mrs. Bardell. [Page 157

  • 31. "Governor in?" inquired Sam. [Page 159

  • 32. It was a pleasant thing to see Mr. Pickwick in the centre of the group. [At Dingley Dell, under the misltoe] Page 169

  • 33. His eyes rested on a form that made his blood run cold. [Gabriel Grub and the Goblin] Page 172

  • 34. "I wish you'd let me bleed you." Page 177

  • 35. A large mass of ice disappeared. [Page 179

  • 36. "get along with you, you old wretch!". [vignetted, Page 191

  • 37. The particular picture upon which Sam Weller's eyes were fixed. [Page 193

  • 38. "No, I don't, my lord," replied Sam, staring right up into the lantern in the roof of the court. [Full-page illustration facing p. 206]

  • 39. Then having drawn on his gloves with great nicety. [Page 209

  • 40. Having taken a short walk through the city. [Page 214

  • 41. Packed up a few necessaries ready for flight. [Page 220

  • 42. "Bless my soul," every body says, "somebody taken suddenly ill! Sawyer, late Nockenorf, sent for!" Page 229

  • 43. "Lor do adun, Mr. Weller!" Page 234

  • 44. "Don't be longer than you can conveniently help, Sir. You're rayther heavy." Page 237

  • 45. "Come on — both of you — both of you!" Page 247

  • 46. Mr. Stiggins raised his hands, and turned up his eyes. [Page 266

  • 47. The arrival of two most unexpected visitors [Sam and Pickwick]. Page 281

  • 48. Resumes his kicking with greater agility than before [Tony Weller vigorously assaults Stiggins at the public house in ch. 52] Page 305

  • 49. "Will you have some of this?"said the Fat Boy. [Page 314

  • 50. "All I can say is, just you keep it till I ask you for it again" [Tony Weller entrusts his estate to Pickwick to invest, ch. 54] Page 324

  • 51. Mr. Snodgrass [full-page illustration]. Facing page 331

  • 52. Uncaptioned Tail-piece [Sam Weller and Mr. Pickwick] Page 332.


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    Last modified 17 January 2012