Part I. “Cinderella to her Sister Arts”

Figure  1. Chagall. Window at Cathédrale Saint-Étienne, Metz, France. Wikimedia.

Figure  2. Fernand Léger. Window at University of Venezuela, Caracas, Venezuela. Wikimedia.

Figure  3. Frank Lloyd Wright. Stained glass window from Darwin D. Martin House, Buffalo, N.Y. (Princeton University Art Museum.

Part II, Chapter 1. The Revival of Stained Glass in the Nineteenth Century

Figure  1. Dirck Crabeth. The Last Supper (detail), 1557. St. Janskerke, Gouda, Netherlands. Wikimedia.

Figure  2. Abraham van Linge. Jonah and the Whale, University College Chapel, Oxford. Courtesy of the Master and Fellows of University College, Oxford.

Figure  3. Abraham van Linge. Six scenes from the life of Jesus; underneath them, six corresponding scenes from the Old Testament. East Window, Lincoln College Chapel, Oxford. Wikimedia.

Figure  4. Francis Eginton. Hope (adapted from the “Assumption of the Virgin” by Guido Reni. 1795. St. Alkmund’s, Shrewsbury, Shropshire. www.Geograph.org© Gordon Griffiths and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

Figure  5. William Collins. St. Paul preaching at Athens. Enamel paint on glass after Raphael tapestry cartoon. 1816.

Figure  6. Joshua Price. Conversion of St Paul (said to be after Sebastiano Ricci. West Window, St. Andrew’s by the Wardrobe, London E.C.4. 1712-1716. www.Geograph.org . © John Salmon and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

Figure  7. Thomas Jervais. The Virtues after oil cartoon by Sir Joshua Reynolds. 1785. New College Chapel, Oxford. www.Geograph.org . © David Purchase and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

[Figure  8. Max Ainmuller, Königliche Glasmalerei-Anstalt,Munich. Moses returning from Sinai with the tablets of the Law , 1855. Peterhouse College, Cambridge. www.Geograph.org © Roger Kidd and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

Figure  9. Franz Xavier Zettler Munich. St. Stephen's Catholic Cathedral, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. 1879. Courtesy of Ray J. Brown. Stained Glass Australia/

Figure  10. John Hedgeland. West Window, Norwich Cathedral. 1854. Wikimedia.

Figure  11. Munich window, St. Margaret’s Parish Church, Dalry, Ayrshire. Early 1870s (?) Courtesy of Gilda T. Smith, Dalry, Ayrshire.

Figure  12. Thomas Willement. East Window St. Peter and St. Paul Parish Church, Belton. 1847. www.Geograph.org © Julian P Guffogg and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

Fig 13. Dante Gabriel Rossetti.Sir Tristram and la belle Ysoude. Commissioned from Morris, Marshal, Faulkner & Co. by Walter Dunlop for Harden Grange near Bingley, Yorkshire. 1862. Now in Bradford Art Gallery. Wikimedia.

Figure  14. William Morris. Queen Guenevere and Isoude. Les Blanches Mains. Commissioned from Morris, Marshal, Faulkner & Co. by Walter Dunlop for Harden Grange near Bingley, Yorkshire. 1862. Now in Bradford Art Gallery. Wikimedia.

Figure  15. E. Burne-Jones. Temptation of Adam. Jesus College, Cambridge. https://www.flickr.com/photos/paulodykes Courtesy of Paul Dykes Photo, London.

Figure  16. Fabian stained glass window, London School of Economics. 1910. Created by Caroline Townshend according to a design by George Bernard Shaw. © LSE / Nigel Stead.

The window was originally stolen from Beatrice Webb House in 1978 but was recovered in 2005 by the Webb Memorial Trust and is on long term loan to the LSE. The window depicts Shaw, Sidney Webb and ER Pease [secretary of the Fabian Society] helping to build the new world. They are in Elizabethan dress which was to poke fun at Pease who loved everything medieval. The people depicted at the bottom were leading members of the Society.

Figure  17. Daniel Cottier. Miriam. Dowanhill Church, Hyndland Street, Glasgow. Now “Cottier’s,” a community centre, theatre and restaurant. 1865-66. Courtesy of David Robertson, Project Director, Four Acres Charitable Church, Glasgow.

Figure  18. Alf Webster. First Fruits. In Memory of Stephen Adam. New Kilpatrick Parish Church. 1911 Courtesy of Karen Mailley-Watt, History Girls Scotland.

Figure  19. Oscar Paterson. The Quaint Village . Doorway at 28 Bute Gardens, Hillhead, Glasgow. c1890. (Property of Glasgow University.) Courtesy of Ian R. Mitchell.

Figure  20. David Gauld. Music. 1891 © Glasgow Life/Glasgow Museums.

Part II, Chapter 2. Charles Winston on stained glass

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Figure  1.St John the Evangelist hands the Palm to the Jew. St. Peter Mancroft Norwich. 15th Century. Now in Burrell Collection, Glasgow. © Glasgow Life/ Glasgow Museums.

Figure  2. Francis Eginton.The Conversion of St. Paul. East Window, St. Paul’s Church, Birmingham. Wikimedia.

Figure  3. Everhard Rensig and/or Gerhard Remisch.Esau gives up his Birthright; Jacob and Esau with the Mess of Pottage. Mariawald Abbey Cloister. 1521. Now in Victoria and Albert Museum, London. © Victoria and Albert Museum; given by Mr E. E. Cook); also Wikimedia.

Part II, Chapter 3. Stephen Adam on stained glass

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Figure  1. Samson and the Lion. Maker unknown. Germany. 16th C. © Victoria and Albert Museum [C.303-1928].

Figure  2. Roundel. St Nicholas as Baker. Netherlands. 16thC. Courtesy of Sam Fogg Ltd. 15D Clifford Street, London W1S 4JZ.

Figure  3. Roundel. Dirck Vellert.Le Jugement de Cambyse. 1541. Amsterdam, Rijksmuseum. Wikimedia.

Figure  4. Pompeo Bertini. Absidial windows illustrating scenes from the Old Testament. Milan, Cathedral. “Vetrate del duomo di Milano.” Wikistand.

Figure  5. Window representing alleged Profanation of the Host by Brussels Jews. Sainte-Gudule Cathedral, Brussels. 16th C. “Brussels Massacre.” Wikipedia.

Figure  6. Dirck Vellert.Martyrdom of the Seven Maccabee Brothers and their Mother. Antwerp. 1530-35. Now at Metropolitan Museum, New York. ©Metropolitan Museum; Mr. and Mrs. Isaac D. Fletcher Collection, Bequest of Isaac D. Fletcher, 1917.

Figure  7. Albert Moore. A Musician. Oil on canvas. 1867. Center for British Art, Yale. Wikimedia.

Figure  8. Edward Poynter. Orpheus and Eurydice. Oil on canvas. 1862. Wikimedia.

Figure  9. John Flaxman.Engraving for Alexander Pope’s translation of The Iliad, 1795.Wikimedia. Photo H.-P.Haack - Antiquariat Dr. Haack, Leipzig.

Figure 10. Heinrich Maria von Hess. Faith-Hope-Charity. Oil on panel. 1819. Hermitage Museum, St. Petersburg. Wikimedia. The Yorck Project.

Figure  11. Moritz von Schwind.Sabina von Steinbach working on the figure of the Synagogue for Strassburg Cathedral. Oil on canvas. 1844. Alte Nationalgalerie, Berlin. Wikipedia.

Figure  12. Johann Schraudolph.Anbetung der Koenige. Fresco. Speyer Cathedral. 1852. Now in the Kaisersaal of the Cathedral. .

Figure  13. Heinrich Maria von Hess. Isaiah. Prophets Window (detail), formerly in North Transept, Glasgow Cathedral. 1850s. Iain Macnair, Glasgow Cathedral: The Stained Glass Windows (Glasgow: Johnsondesign, 2009). Courtesy of Andrew Macnair.

Figure  14. E. Siebertz (Munich.The Dream and the Promise. 1850s. Formerly in North Transept, Glasgow Cathedral. Iain Macnair, Glasgow Cathedral: The Stained Glass Windows (Glasgow: Johnsondesign, 2009). Courtesy of Andrew Macnair.

Figure  15. Pompeo Bertini. Milan. John the Baptist. 1867. Lauder’s Crypt, Glasgow Cathedral. Iain Macnair, Glasgow Cathedral: The Stained Glass Windows (Glasgow: Johnsondesign, 2009). Courtesy of Andrew Macnair.

Part III, Chapter 1. Stephen Adam: The Early Years and the Glasgow Studio

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Figure  1. Daniel Cottier. Spring.1873-75. © Metropolitan Museum, New York; Gift of Estate of Virginia Guard Brooks and the Guard family, 2007.

Figure  2. Stephen Adam Jr. Suffer the Little Children . Formerly in Trinity Congregational Church, Glasgow, now at St. James the Less Episcopal Church, Bishopbriggs, Glasgow. Courtesy of Ian R. Mitchell.

Figure  3. Stephen Adam Jr. Window at 8 Belhaven Terrace, West End, Glasgow. Courtesy of Gordon R. Urquhart, F.S.A. Scot.

Figure  4. Stephen Adam and Alf Webster. St.Nicholas Church, Lanark. 1910. Courtesy of Stephen Weir of Stephen Weir Stained Glass, Glasgow. In Stephen Weir’s view, the style of this window would indicate that it was designed by Adam himself.

Figure  5. Alf Webster. Miracle of the Loaves and Fishes. 1911. Lansdowne Church, Great Western Road, Glasgow (now “Webster’s Theatre,” a community center. Templeton Memorial Window, centre light, lower panel. Photo by Tom Donald via Creative Commons license. .Flickr.

Figure  6. Stephen Adam. Cleopatra. In the villa known as “The Knowe” by architect “Greek” Thomson, Pollokshields, Glasgow. 1890. Courtesy of Gordon R. Urquhart, F.S.A. Scot.

Figure  7. Stephen Adam. Window at 2 Devonshire Gardens, West End, Glasgow [now Hotel du Vin]. Courtesy of Ian R. Mitchell.

Figure  8. Stephen Adam. Window at 2 Devonshire Gardens, West End, Glasgow [now Hotel du Vin]. Courtesy of Ian R. Mitchell.

Figure  9. Stephen Adam. Window at Carnegie Public Library, Ayr. 1894. Courtesy of Tom Barclay, Reference & Local History Librarian, South Ayrshire Council.

Figure  10. Andrew Carnegie, with Mrs. Carnegie, at opening ceremony of the Public Library bearing his name in Ayr. Courtesy of Tom Barclay, Reference & Local History Librarian, South Ayrshire Council.

Figure  11. Stephen Adam. Panels at Imperial Bar, Howard Street, Glasgow Courtesy of John Gorevan, www.oldglasgowpubs.co.uk.  © John Gorevan.

Figure  12. St. Andrew’s in the Square Parish Church, Glasgow. Interior, showing the Adam window. Courtesy of Donald Whannell, Neilstonphotogallery@drookitagain.co.uk.

Figure  13. St Andrew's in the Square Parish Church, Glasgow. Stephen Adam window. 1874. Courtesy of Ian R. Mitchell.

Figure  14. St Andrew's in the Square Parish Church, Glasgow. Detail of Crombie window. Courtesy of Ian R. Mitchell.

Figure  15. Belhaven United Presbyterian Church, Glasgow (now St. Luke’s Greek Orthodox Cathedra. Stephen Adam window, detail of left light. Courtesy of Nondas Pitticas, community administrator.

Figure  16. Stephen Adam. Baird South Window. Alloway Parish Church, Alloway, Ayrshire, 1877. Courtesy of David Lewis, Alloway Church of Scotland Parish Church.

Figure  17. Stephen Adam. Mary, Joseph and Jesus. Alloway Parish Church, Baird South Window, Detail of left light. Courtesy of David Lewis, Alloway.

Figure  18. Stephen Adam. Adoration of the Magi. Alloway Parish Church. Baird South Window. Detail of right light. Courtesy of David Lewis, Alloway.

Figure  19. Stephen Adam. Angel. Alloway Parish Church. Baird South Window. Detail of centre light. Courtesy of David Lewis, Alloway.

Figure  20. Stephen Adam. West or Preachers Window. 1892-93. Clark Memorial Church, Largs, Ayrshire. Courtesy of Dr. Nigel Lawrie and Eastwood Photographic Society.

Figure  21. Stephen Adam. David Playing before Saul. Two-light window. Clark Memorial Church, Largs. Courtesy of Dr. Nigel Lawrie and Eastwood Photographic Society.

Figure  22. Stephen Adam. Ruth and Boaz Two-light window. Clark Memorial Church, Largs. Courtesy of Dr. Nigel Lawrie and Eastwood Photographic Society, Glasgow.

Figure  23. Stephen Adam. Jesus Visits Martha and Mary. Two-light window. Clark Memorial Church, Largs. Courtesy of Dr. Nigel Lawrie and Eastwood Photographic Society, Glasgow.

Figure  24. Friedrich Overbeck. Ostermorgen (Easter Morning. c. 1818. Oil on canvas. Museum Kunstpalast-Düsseldorf. Wikipedia.

Figure  25. Franz Pforr. Sulamit und Maria (Shulamith and Mary. 1810-11. Oil on wood. Schweinfurt, Sammlung Georg Schäfer. Wikipedia.

Figure  26. Julius Schnorr von Carolsfeld. Der heilige Rochus, Almosen verteilend (St. Roch giviing alms). 1817. Oil on canvas. Museum der bildenden Künste, Leipzig. Wikimedia.

Figure  27. Joseph von Fuehrich. Jakob und Rachel. 1836. Oil on canvas. Österreichische Galerie Belvedere, Vienna. Wikipedia.

Figure 28. Friedrich Overbeck. Death of Joseph. 1857. From posterprint.

Figure  30. Frederick Preedy. Death of Joseph. 1858. All Saints Church, Church Lench, Worcestershire. Courtesy of Tudor Barlow [Flickr])

Figure  31. Stephen Adam studio. Dockworkers . 1908. Board Room, Clydeport, Glasgow. Ppanel illustrating “Commerce.” Courtesy of Gordon Barr.

Figure  32. Stephen Adam studio. Dockworkers . 1908. Board Room, Clydeport, Glasgow. Panel illustrating “Commerce.” Courtesy of Donald Whannell,  Neilstonphotogallery@drookitagain.co.uk.

Figure  33. Stephen Adam studio. Riveters . 1908. Board Room, Clydeport, Glasgow. Panel illustrating “Engineering.” Courtesy of Gordon Barr.

Figure  34. Adam studio. Riveters. 1908. Board Room, Clydeport, Glasgow. Panel illustrating “Engineering.” Courtesy of Ian R. Mitchell.

Figure  35. Oyster Bar, Café Royal, Edinburgh Stained glass representing modern sportsmen, designed by Tom Wilson and made by the Ballantine studio, Edinburgh. 1890s. (Scotland Places.

Part III, Chapter 2. “Blessed is he who has found his work.”

Figure  1. Window representing gold miners. 1330. Freiburg Cathedral, Germany. Courtesy of Prof. Kathleen Cohen, San Jose State University, © Kathleen Cohen.

Figure  2. Bakers' window. 13th Century. Chartres Cathedral. Courtesy of Mary K. Bosshart; Out and About in Paris.

Figure  3. Labours of the Months (July. Haymaking. Stained glass panel. 1450-1475. .

Figure  4. Labours of the Months (October) . c1480 © Victoria and Albert Museum, London. C.134-1931) .

Figure  5. Sugar Refinery. Engraving by Jan Collaert after Jan Van der Straet (Stradanus), New Inventions of Modern Times [Nova Reperta] , plate 13. C. 1600 © Metropolitan Museum of Art; Harris Brisbane Dick Fund, 1934.

Figure  6. Abraham Bosse. A Printing Shop. Etching. 1642. © Metropolitan Museum of Art; Purchase, Rogers Fund, 1922.

Figure  7. William Bell Scott. Iron and Coal. . Oil on canvas. 1861. Wallington Hall Northumberland. Wikimedia.

Figure  8. Ford Madox Brown. Work. Oil on canvas. 1865. Manchester Art Gallery.

Figure  9. Godfrey Sykes. Interior of an Ironworks. Oil on canvas. 1850. Yale Center for British Art. Wikimedia.

Figure  10. Sheffield Steel Manufactures. Hall of the Fork Grinders.” Illustrated London News 48 (March 10, 1886): 225.

Figure  11. Sir John Lavery. Shipbuilding on the Clyde. (Fairfield Shipyard, Govan. Preparatory painting for mural on South side of Banqueting Hall, Glasgow City Chambers. 1900. Glasgow Museums Rescource Centre. Courtesy of Glasgow Life/GlasgowMuseums.

Figure  12. Adolf Menzel. The Iron Rolling Mill. Oil on canvas. 1872-75. Nationalgalerie, Berlin. Wikimedia.

Figure  13. Paul Meyerheim. Lebensgeschichte einer Lokomotive. Oil on canvas. 1874. Märkisches Museum, Berlin. Wikimedia.

Figure  14. Thomas Anschutz. The Ironworkers’ Noontime. Oil on canvas. 1880. Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco. Wikimedia.

Figure  15. Sir John Everett Millais. Christ in the house of his parents. The Carpenter’s Shop. Oil on canvas. 1849-50. Tate Gallery, London.

Figure 15a. William Holman Hunt. The Shadow of Death. Oil on canvas. 1873. Manchester Art Gallery.

Figure  16. Govan Burgh Arms. My Govan.

Figure  17. Henry Stacy Marks. Capital and labour. Oil on canvas. 1874. Auctioned at Sotheby’s, May 2013. Wikimedia.

Part III, 3. An Original Style: Realism and Neo-Classicism in the Maryhill Panels.

Figure  1. Peter von Cornelius. Joseph Recognized by his Brothers. Fresco. 1816-1817. Casa Bartholdy, Rome. Now in Alte Nationalgalerie, Berlin. Wikimedia .

Figure  2. Schnorr von Carolsfeld. Ariosto room. Frescos. 1819-1822. Casino Massimo Lancellotti, Rome. Courtesy of  Atlantedellarteitaliana.

Figure  3. Pierre Puvis de Chavannes. Le Travail. Oil on canvas. 1863. National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., Widener Collection. © National Gallery of Art.

Figure  4. Pierre Puvis de Chavannes. Le Bois sacré. Wall painting. 1884. Musée de Lyon. Wikimedia.

Figure  5. Pierre Puvis de Chavannes. Inspiration Chrétienne. Oil on paper, mounted on canvas. c1887-88. Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, D.C. no. 1929.6.84 © Smithsonian American Art Museum.

Figure  6. Adam Panels in situ in Mary Hill Burgh Halls. Courtesy of the Maryhill Burgh Halls Trust.

Figure  7. Sample of panels in Maryhill Burgh Halls. © Glasgow Life/Glasgow Museums.

Figure  8. John Hardman Powell and Augustus Welby Pugin. Hardman's Workshop . Window in St Chad's Roman Catholic Cathedral, Birmingham. 1850. Photograph by Jacqueline Banerjee.

Figure  9. Clayton & Bell. Cornish Miners working at Dolcoath. 1907. Truro Cathedral, Cornwall, N. nave aisle, W. window. Courtesy of The Chapter of Truro Cathedral.

Figure  10. Chesterfield Parish Church of Our Lady and All Saints. Detail of window celebrating the 750th anniversary of the church.. 1984. Courtesy of Dr. Phil Brown. Docs Pics.

Figure  11. John Radecki. Window in memory of Rupert Cropley, Masonic School Assembly Hall, Sydney, N.S.W., Australia. 1951. Courtesy of Museum of Freemasonry, Sydney. “Stained Glass School Window.” Museum of Freemasonry, Sydney site.

Figure  12. Napier Waller. Australian War Memorial. Hall of Memory. South Window . 1950 [commissioned 1937]. “Hall of Memory - the stained-glass windows.” Australian War Memorial.

Figure  13. Jan-Thorn Prikker. Der Künstler als Lehrer für Handel und Gewerbe. 1910. Hauptbahnhof, Hagen, Germany. (Wikimedia.

Figure  14. Charles Connick. Broadcasting. Early 20thC. St. John the Divine, New York. Nave, S. wall, 4th bay, foot of r. lancet. Detail. Courtesy of Painton Cowen. ©bPainton Cowen.

Figure  15. Herbert Hendrie. Window replacing one of the Munich windows and representing workers. 1939. Glasgow Cathedral. Courtesy of Ian R. Mitchell.

Figure  16. Stephen Adam. Two-light window. 1892. Clark Memorial Church, Largs, Ayrshire. Courtesy of Dr. Nigel Lawrie and Eastwood Photographic Society, Glasgow.

Figure  17. Sir Edward Burne-Jones. Saint Cecilia. c. 1900. Made by Morris & Co. (Princeton University Art Museum; museum purchase, Surdna Fund.

Figure  18. W.A. Van de Walle. Miner. 1936. Design for the workers' insurance company, De Centrale, The Hague. 1936. International Institute of Social History.

The windows themselves have been destroyed, but the artist’s cartoons have been preserved) Courtesy of International Institute of Social History, The Netherlands. .


Last modified 24 June 2016