A great inequality is noticeable when we contrast the plates that represent natural forces and the engines that are their instruments with other plates that depict the individual labours of mankind. No matter how great is the emphasis that he gives to the stature, the gesture or the strain of effort in his workmen, sawyers, bricklayers, dyers, tanners, rowers, or sailors hauling boats, by the artful dimensions of his grouping, he is scarcely successful, and hardly seems to trouble about making them very interesting; hence his composition often lacks what is necessary to express the power of their effort — intensity of accent, expressive synthesis. Lifeless things, on the other hand, like machines, receive from his needle the most striking colour and character. The infinite power that is for the moment imprisoned in them seems to interest him intensely. Such, indeed, is the impression that the wharf, like the factory, produces upon us; there the man, whose intelligence enslaves and controls these inorganic forces, seems in such places the inferior, the slave almost, of the monsters that he has in reality tamed. [Sparrow, Frank Brangwyn and His Work, 162-63]

Etchings

1title1

Lithographs

Bibliography

Sparrow, Walter Shaw. Frank Brangwyn and His Work. New York: Dana Estes, 1911. Internet Archive version of a copy in the Ontario College of Art. Web. 28 December 2012.

Sparrow, Walter Shaw. Prints and Drawings of Frank Brangwyn with Some Other Phases of His Art. London: John Lane, 1919. Internet Archive version of a copy in the Ontario College of Art. Web. 28 December 2012.


Victorian Web Homepage Visual Arts Sir Frank Brangwyn RA RWS PRBA HRSA, 1867-1956

Last modified 28 December 2012